Games

A fascinating visual novel about time travel by one of the authors of Suikoden

Illustration of an article titled Attractive Visual Novel about Time Travel from one of the creators of emSuikoden / em

Figure: Konami

To Time HollowTime travel is painful, complex, sloppy, and history gets worse with every intervention.The spiritual successor to another game I enjoyed Shadow of Memories, It actually took some time to track down this ambiguous Nintendo DS visual novel published by Konami in 2008. When it turned out to be Junko Kawano’s director Illusion Suikoden Series, I prioritized playing it.

undefined

Figure: Konami

The game revolves around Ethan Kairos, who looks like a normal high school student. Then one morning he woke up and learned that he had just seen his parents the night before, but his parents died 12 years ago. Only Ethan seems to know how much things have changed, as someone is stitching together versions of his history. That’s because he has a special item called the Hollow Pen, a family heirloom with the ability to change history. This pen is more powerful than time itself, as long as you know where to draw a circle to jump in the past.

Ethan travels through multiple alternative worlds and makes small changes from saving the lives of someone’s dog to preventing a friend from being arrested after attacking someone. Life-changing situations can be so subtle and trivial that how our lives differ, for example, if we miss the person or miss a more influential accidental encounter. I was made to think about it. Time Hollow It does a good job of showing how capricious and unpredictable the situation is. In one history, Ethan’s uncle Derek is a distant and cold authority. After hitting the pen a few times, Derek becomes a heartwarming guardian. Parents also succeed as owners of the cafe and do their best for Ethan’s lost parents.

undefined

Figure: Konami

Time Hollow It is most successful when it focuses on the whims of time and soap opera.It also doesn’t flood the player with text and skips much of his school’s everyday routine (I don’t like this) Persona, Dive into the class and participate in daily activities). The story focuses primarily on Ethan’s work as an editor of the manuscript of his friend’s life. Flashbacks, frozen photographs showing important turning points, are a personal indicator of revelation that Ethan needs to reveal with each jump. As the story shifts gear and focuses on unraveling the plot that killed his parents, it becomes a bit more complicated and confusing. Ethan has a rival hollow pen user, Irving. Irving is messing around with misguided revenge on his mother’s death. The actual resolution is not as satisfying as seeing how complex the gradations that make up a person’s tapestry are. The story is in conflict between two seemingly contradictory concepts. The idea that a person’s life changes in an instant, and a more deadly theme that cannot change fate no matter how hard you try.

Despite the winding threads in the story, this visual novel is linear in its vectorized approach. The road is winding everywhere, but I don’t have much freedom when it comes to choosing time language. It’s also a very short journey at the heart of an intertwined puzzle of the mysterious girl Kori Twelves. If all life was a labyrinth, she would be there to make things even more mysterious, playing both the victim and the savior, and her role would somehow change unaffected. If it sounds self-contradictory in nature, it’s because the story of time travel is usually like that. The paradox is to change the past, but in theory when it no longer happens, we somehow notice the change. It’s hard to juggle the divergent timeline while trying to maintain a coherent arc. Time Hollow Probably not pleasing to lovers of the time travel genre, but interesting enough to dispel complaints about plot discrepancies (the game actually reminded me of plot plots). Star Trek: Voyager An episode called “The Year of Hell”). It’s backed by great anime-style art and generally likable characters.It’s rarely done to overturn the metaphor of a typical anime character, but it’s okay Time Hollow Players can see how strange the time is. The entire game ends with a loop that guarantees Ethan to literally repeat history.

The game resonated with me on a personal level. I’m a bit vague here for privacy reasons, but earlier this year there was some trauma to someone important to me. It was shocking to see the person change after the event. The direct cause was so trivial that I wish I could use something like a pen to quickly identify the cause. The way time and its events can cause cavities at the emotional and spiritual levels was amazing to witness. I keep thinking about what would happen if there was a way to prevent the incident from happening.

Time Hollow It is a wish fulfillment. After all, everything will be resolved or improved in some way. Real life is not so putt. Most of us, with the exception of historical revisionists, stick to our decisions and subsequent regrets. Even if you tell yourself that you’re not going to stick to your past choices, it’s hard not to. I wish I had a hollow pen to eliminate the suffering. But hoping that the next page will be a little better, all I can do is deal with and drive away my personal pain with the inks of everyday life.

https://kotaku.com/the-fascinating-visual-novel-about-time-travel-from-one-1845924939

Back to top button