Science & Technology

Chemists discover a faster-acting form of the insecticide imidacloprid

NYU chemists have developed a new crystalline form of imidacloprid, one of the most widely used pesticides in the world, to significantly reduce its environmental impact. Credit: Xiaolong Zhu

Scientists have developed seven crystalline forms of imidacloprid, one of the most widely used pesticides in the world, to significantly reduce its environmental impact. Journal of the American Chemical Society.. The new form runs up to 9 times faster than the original version. This means that less can be used to control insects such as mosquitoes that carry infections, reducing the potential for harm to other organisms such as bees.


By using the modified form of ” Imidacloprid, We may have a sustainable strategy to improve Insecticide“The ability to control mosquito disease vectors while reducing the amount needed,” said Bart Karl, a professor of chemistry at New York University who studied crystal growth and led the study. It provides a route to minimize exposure and harm to living organisms. Not only does it delay the onset of mosquito resistance development, but it is also the urgency of an epidemic of malaria. “

Imidacloprid is part of a family of neonicotinoid insecticides that act on the central nervous system of insects by binding to the same receptors as nicotine. When an insect lands on a surface sprayed with imidacloprid, pesticide molecules are absorbed from the crystals through the foot, destroying the nervous system.

Imidacloprid is used in a variety of settings, from crop protection to the treatment of pet fleas. It is also sprayed indoors and outdoors for public health applications. Unfortunately, the widespread use of imidacloprid in agricultural environments is strongly associated with the decline of bee colonies, which is troublesome given the importance of pollen maters for crops and flowers.While European Union banned Although imidacloprid is used for its acute toxicity to honeybees, it is still sold in the United States and is widely used in more than 100 countries around the world.

Chemists discover a faster-acting form of the insecticide imidacloprid

NYU chemists have developed a new crystalline form of imidacloprid, one of the most widely used pesticides in the world, to significantly reduce its environmental impact. Credit: Xiaolong Zhu

Michael Ward, a professor of chemistry and research author at New York University, said: “We were as successful as manipulating another pesticide, Deltamethrin. Produces a faster crystal version.. “

In Journal of the American Chemical Society In the study, researchers discovered seven new crystalline forms of imidacloprid, one of which is in commercial use, in addition to two existing versions. Researcher and researcher Xiaolong Zhu created most new crystal forms by melting and cooling commercially available crystal forms.

Researchers then tested three stable new forms of imidacloprid against mosquitoes that carry three types of disease (“Aedes, Dengue fever, Chikungunya fever, yellow fever, and Zika fever. Anopheles, Carry malaria; Culex, Carrying lymphatic filariasis) and fruit flies. All three forms of imidacloprid functioned much faster than the commercial forms, one killing mosquitoes nine times faster. Fast-acting pesticides are important for the rapid control of mosquitoes before they continue to propagate or spread the disease, reducing the likelihood of developing pesticide resistance.

  • Chemists discover a faster-acting form of the insecticide imidacloprid

    NYU chemists have developed a new crystalline form of imidacloprid, one of the most widely used pesticides in the world, to significantly reduce its environmental impact. Credit: Xiaolong Zhu

  • Chemists discover a faster-acting form of the insecticide imidacloprid

    NYU chemists have developed a new crystalline form of imidacloprid, one of the most widely used pesticides in the world, to significantly reduce its environmental impact. Credit: Xiaolong Zhu

  • Chemists discover a faster-acting form of the insecticide imidacloprid

    NYU chemists have developed a new crystalline form of imidacloprid, one of the most widely used pesticides in the world, to significantly reduce its environmental impact. Credit: Xiaolong Zhu

In particular, the most active forms of imidacloprid are expected to be used outdoors in the laboratory and in the field. The crystals were easily prepared by heating and cooling and remained stable at room temperature. The more active crystalline form tends to be less stable and often turns into a more stable counterpart with less pesticide activity, but the fastest acting version of imidacloprid lasts for at least 6 months. Did.

“Imidacloprid is very interested in the composition of the substance, but at the same time it is very popular. If North American regulators do not ban it, simple interventions to minimize environmental exposure are worthwhile. Maybe, “says Kahr. “In-depth study of Crystal growth It may provide a strategy to achieve the goal of preventing infections with imidacloprid while reducing the likelihood of developing resistance. ”


AC magnetic field responsive nanoplatform developed to control pesticide release


For more information:
Imidacloprid crystal polymorphs for disease vector control and protection of pollen maters, Journal of the American Chemical Society (2021). DOI: 10.1021 / jacs.1c07610

Quote: The chemist is the insecticide imidacloprid (October 12, 2021) obtained from https://phys.org/news/2021-10-chemists-faster-acting-insecticide-imidacloprid.html on October 12, 2021. Discover a more immediate form of day)

This document is subject to copyright. No part may be reproduced without written permission, except for fair transactions for personal investigation or research purposes. The content is provided for informational purposes only.



Chemists discover a faster-acting form of the insecticide imidacloprid

https://phys.org/news/2021-10-chemists-faster-acting-insecticide-imidacloprid.html Chemists discover a faster-acting form of the insecticide imidacloprid

Back to top button