Science & Technology

Drink all types of coffee (even without caffeine) associated with a reduced risk of chronic liver disease

Drinking decaffeinated (ground or instant) or decaffeinated coffee reduces the risk of developing chronic liver disease and associated liver conditions, according to a study published in an open access journal. BMC Public Health..

Researchers at the University of Southampton and the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom found that drinking all types of coffee reduced the risk of developing chronic liver disease and dying compared to not drinking coffee, with an effect of 3 to 3 per day. I found that it peaked with 4 cups.

The authors surveyed UK Biobank data on 495,585 participants with known coffee consumption and median over 10.7 years to monitor those who developed chronic liver disease and related liver disease. I tracked it.

Of all participants included in the study, 78% (384,818) consumed ground or instant decaffeinated or decaffeinated coffee, and 22% (109,767) did not drink any type of coffee. It was. During the study, there were 3,600 chronic liver diseases, including 301 deaths. In addition, there were 5,439 cases of chronic liver disease or steatosis (accumulation of liver fat, also known as fatty liver disease), and 184 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma, a type of liver cancer.

Compared to non-coffee drinkers, coffee drinkers have a 21% reduction in risk of chronic liver disease, a 20% reduction in risk of chronic or fatty liver disease, and a 49% reduction in risk of death from chronic liver disease. Did. The greatest effect was seen in the group who drank ground coffee containing high levels of ingredients of kahweol and cafestol, which have been shown to be beneficial for chronic liver disease in animals.

Instant coffee with low levels of kahweol and cafestol was also associated with a reduced risk of chronic liver disease. The reduction in risk was less than that associated with ground coffee, but this finding may suggest that other ingredients, or potentially combinations of ingredients, may be beneficial. ..

Lead author Dr. Oliver Kennedy said: “Coffee is widely available and the benefits gained from our study may mean that it can provide potential preventive treatment for chronic liver disease. This is low income and goes to health care. It is especially valuable in countries with poor access and the highest burden of chronic liver disease. “

The authors reported coffee consumption only when participants first enrolled in the study, so this study considered changes in the amount and type of coffee consumed during the 10.7-year study period. Please note that it is not. Participants are primarily Caucasian and have a high socio-economic background, so it may be difficult to generalize the findings to other countries or groups.

Future studies suggest that tighter control of coffee consumption may allow us to test the relationship between coffee and liver disease. They also suggest verifying their findings with a more diverse group of participants.

See: “All types of coffee reduce the risk of adverse clinical outcomes in chronic liver disease: UK Biobank study,” June 21, 2021 BMC Public Health..
DOI: 10.1186 / s12889-021-10991-7



Drink all types of coffee (even without caffeine) associated with a reduced risk of chronic liver disease

https://scitechdaily.com/drinking-any-type-of-coffee-even-decaf-associated-with-reduced-risk-of-chronic-liver-disease/ Drink all types of coffee (even without caffeine) associated with a reduced risk of chronic liver disease

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