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Giants vs. Rams: What to look for when the Giants have the ball – NFL Sports

NS New York Giants Returned to Meadowland, injuring 1-4 records and ward-equivalent injuries.

This isn’t the time to face one of the hottest teams in the NFL, but it’s where they host. Los Angeles Rams 6th week.

In the ugly sense of déjà vu, Rams raises some similar issues against the Giants’ attack. Dallas Cowboys I did it last week. Like the Cowboys, Rams have the highest average defenses endangered by their attacks. With the addition of Matt Stafford, DeSean Jackson, and Sony Michelle to Sean McVay’s attack, the game is ready to take over. McVay has always been a genius when it comes to creating elegant attack schemes and manipulating defenses using game scripts and play sequences. However, by replacing Jared Goff with Stafford, McBay was able to fully open the playbook and attack all areas of the field at any time. Similarly, adding Jackson’s speed gives Cooper Cup and Robert Woods more room to work under it.

And like the Cowboys, its powerful attacks put a lot of pressure on your opponent’s attacks, making them play faster and score more often.

So what can the Giants expect when they have the ball? Also, is there an area that can be attacked?

The beginning of a disappointing season

Rams is currently sitting 4-1 and is winning reign. Bouncy ball Champion and fierce division rivals. Many teams are thrilled to have such a “disappointment” on their resume.

But that’s not what I’m talking about. Despite the success and victory of the Rams attack, Rams’ defense is clearly disappointing, especially compared to the 2020 season.

Last year, Rams had the best defense in the NFL. They minimized the total yards, yards per play, yards per pass and yards per trial, yards per hurry and carry, and the number of touchdowns passed in the NFL.

So far in 2021, Rams has been ranked 25th in the transit yard, 27th in the total yard, and 15th in the net yard in a single trial (although the number of transit touchdowns allowed is It is tied because it is the fifth smallest).

In that context, yes, the beginning of 2021 was certainly frustrating and disappointing for Rams fans.

but why?

Most of the puzzles started with Brandon Staley Los Angeles Chargers‘Head coach. Starry was welcomed as a brilliant young football mind as “Sean McVay” on the ball’s defense side.

Starry was replaced by Raheem Morris. Morris is a longtime defensive coach (became a defensive back coach at Cornell University in 1999), but has less than two years of experience as a defensive coordinator.Morris has a year Kansas2006 Defensive Coordinator and Atlanta FalconsAfter serving as defensive coordinator in 2020, he was appointed as interim head coach on October 12.

Morris vowed to keep Starry’s plans intact, and he seems to have at least kept a rough structure.

The first figure shows Rams coverage usage from the 2020 season, and the second figure shows the coverage so far this year.

Morris uses a higher percentage of Cover 3 than Rams used a year ago, but Cover 3, Cover 4, and Cover 6 are the primary alignments in Rams’ secondary and are consistent.

Similarly, Morris uses nickel packages in 2, 4, and 3 Downlinemen as well.

2020

2021

Similarly, Rams is shining and putting pressure on quarterbacks at the same rate as a year ago.

So, if the overall structure of the scheme is the same as it was a year ago, why has defense production dropped so much?

Part of that is that Morris is not Starry. They are different men who react differently to in-game situations. Just because they call similar playbooks doesn’t mean they come up with the same answer.

But also, defensive performance is often a barometer of the teams faced. If you perform a poorly defended attack, they will obviously be ranked higher.And in the last three weeks, Rams has been with Tom Brady Buccaneers, Kyler Murray and Cardinals, with Russell Wilson Seahawks.. They got 2-1 on that stretch, but it’s a quarterback stretch that’s hard to look good on.

Giants should definitely No You should underestimate Rams’defense based on the 6th week ranking and get the Rams count across the salt shakers.

Beware of Aaron Donald

The Giants attack line has good news and bad news.

Fortunately, Rams’ defensive lineman Aaron Donald hasn’t been the best Pass Rush interior lineman in the NFL since ESPN began tracking Pass Rush’s winning percentage. In fact, he is iDL’s third in pass rush win percentage since the fifth week, following Javone Hargrave with JJ Watt (25% win percentage) and 27% ridiculous win percentage.

Terrible news? Donald’s 22% win rate is slightly below the league’s top 24% win rate he posted in the last two years.He is still For real He is good at making the life of an aggressive lineman miserable.

Rams also makes good use of Donald’s unusual frame and athletic performance. Not only do they use him as the dominant defensive tackle, but they also use him as a 4i and 5 technique on the front lines of the three. Donald is also lined up as a true defensive end. This should be a nightmare for almost every OT in the NFL.

But while Donald is Rams’ best player and one of the best defenders in the NFL, he’s not the only threat on LA’s defensive front.

Last year, the Rams added edge Leonard Floyd and Terrell Lewis to their free agents and drafts, respectively. Floyd responded in his career season, recording 11.5 bags and winning a four-year extension. He seems to have recovered from a break last year with 3.0 sack, 5 QB hits, and a total of 13 rushes (losing 4 tackles) in 5 games.

Lewis had a destructive ability when he was on the field, but was limited to eight games due to injury. This year he is already in line with the total of bags a year ago and seems to be improving over the years. Lewis has a bag and tackle for losing in each of the last two games to go with QB hits and forced fumbles.

The Floyd and Lewis duo take the Rams off the edge and respond to Aaron Donald’s turmoil … wherever he’s lined up. They were defensive lines with A’Shawn Robinson and Sebastian Joseph-Day joining Front 7. Robinson is one of the NFL’s toughest defensive tackles, at 6 feet-4,330, the former Alabama lineman is extremely difficult to get off the line of scrimmage.

Joseph Day has been hailed as one of the stars under Rams’ radar throughout the first five games of the season. In addition to being an effective nose guardle, Joseph Day also has two bags in his name.

Between the two, Rams generally did a good job of controlling the opponent’s running game. Kyler Murray has proven to be a handful in any defense, but has done enough work against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Tom brady It was Buc’s main rusher.

The good news for the Giants is that the position of the linebackers inside is a matter of Rams’ defense. Troy Reeder and Kenny Young are great players within their limits, but their limited range and athleticism offer the modern NFL an opportunity.

The Giants do a good job of trying to attack Leader and Young with Kadarius Toney, Evan Engram and Devontae Booker in the pass game. Not only is it a potential yard opportunity, but the type of route that isolates the linebacker is usually fast enough to blunt the opposite pass rush.

Shake up in the secondary

One of the biggest changes in Rams’ defense from a year ago was in the secondary.

Rams lost the safety of John Johnson III Cleveland Browns With a free agent. Johnson was an effective free safety for Rams, and his absence stressed the rest of the unit to make up for it.

In particular, Taylor Wrap is required to reduce the role of his natural safety and linebacker hybrid, and to provide more freedom of safety. Rap is a great player in the tackle box, but free safety is inconvenient for his skill set. This not only weakens the center of Rams’ defense by missing a lap, but can also make the deeper part of the field more vulnerable to attack (Jabril Peppers and Landon Collins are forced to patrol the deeper center. For example).

Another big change is how Rams used the star cornerback Jaylen Ramsey.

When Giants fans think of Ramsey, they probably think of a “typical” shutdown corner that is lined up outside and removes either X or Flanker from the game in his coverage. And it’s been a Ramsey game for a long time. But last year, Joe Staley started experimenting and moved Ramsey a bit into the slot. According to the NFL NextGenStats, Ramsey played 17% of snaps from slot alignment in 2020. At that point, it was about twice the highest rate in his career, but slots for NFL crimes to increasingly play their best receivers and take advantage of free releases.

This year, Ramsey played most of the snaps in slots. Completely 56 percent per NextGenStats.

That doesn’t make Ramsey an influential player. He’s still one of the best cornerbacks in the NFL, but it could change the calculations of the team expecting one of the external receivers to be robbed. The presence of Ramsey in slots can cause problems for Giants who prefer to use slot placement as one of the focal points of their attacks. Many of their play, which is a dependable play with scheme separation or important down, is designed to go to slot receivers.

With Rams in the slot, Rams used David Long Jr. and Darius Williams as the outer corners. Williams defeated the Seattle Seahawks 26-17, suffered an ankle sprain, and was placed on the injured list. This opens the door for the Rookie Corner Roberto Shell to start. Of course, Rochelle is a newcomer from central Arkansas in a small school, and like all other newcomers, you should expect to be chosen by the Giants. That said, Rochelle brings an intriguing skill set to the field. He is an extraordinary athlete who combines a 4.41 40-yard dash, a 43-inch vertical jump, and a 6-foot, 193-pound 6.68-second 3-cone drill. He also demonstrated great ball skills at college, defending his last two years at Central Arkansas with nine passcuts and 28 passes.

Targeting Rochelle can give the Giants a chance, but his characteristics suggest that it is a mistake to be careless when doing so.

– NFL Sports

Giants vs. Rams: What to look for when the Giants have the ball

https://www.bigblueview.com/2021/10/14/22722360/2021-ny-giants-offense-la-rams-defense-aaron-donald-jalen-ramsey-analysis Giants vs. Rams: What to look for when the Giants have the ball

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