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Illinois farmers say crops look good, but they don’t break records

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Illinois farmers say crops look good, but they don’t break records

Farmers in Central Illinois say that timely rain keeps his corn and soybeans in good condition, even if they don’t think the crop will be a record setter.

Rencordin Farm near Assembension, Illinois, and he tells Brownfield that the next few weeks of weather will have a significant impact on the crop’s breeding stage.

“As these rains, which we all want, continue to fall, we will be monitoring and scouting for more diseases, and if the rains remain dry, there will be insects to deal with.” Corzine found several tassel in his cornfield, indicating that widespread tassel will occur within 10 days of the next week.

According to Kojin, a storm a few weeks ago reduced corn yields, but they are now recovering. As he turns his eyes to the fall, he is concerned about the increased costs of harvesting and marketing crops.

“We are only 35 miles from Decatur, Illinois, and the cost of transporting grain to Decatur has doubled.”

Corzine was able to survive the planting season without many supply chain issues. So far, all the fertilizers and crop protectants he needs are available.



Illinois farmers say crops look good, but they don’t break records

https://brownfieldagnews.com/news/illinois-farmer-says-crops-look-good-but-wont-break-records/ Illinois farmers say crops look good, but they don’t break records

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