Business & Investment

“I’m held hostage in my house”: My husband’s son lives with us.He is physically abusive and menacing

I’m married, but my house is just my name. When I bought it in 2010, my husband, who was dismissed in the recession, had a temporary job, so I was the only one who could apply for a mortgage.

The house in front of me that I bought when I was single had a fair amount of fairness. However, while my husband was working sporadically, he needed repairs and couldn’t sell immediately because he didn’t have the money to repair them. I then borrowed a loan from the retirement fund to pay for the repairs.

When the old house was sold, the money was used to refinance and repay the mortgage of the current house. This is just my name. I am a mortgage payer. (We live in Georgia.)

“”
“I’m the one who pays the mortgage.”

My husband is 62 years old and I am 61 years old. There were more serious hospitalizations, including pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, and cerebrospinal fluid leakage, both of which are in chronic health.

My husband’s son is almost 29 years old and still lives with us. He pays no rent or contributes less to household chores and is the worst total slob, especially rude, rude, physically and mentally abusive and menacing to me.

I’m sorry, but that’s the truth of the matter. I feel like he’s being held hostage in his house, which he treats like a dump. My son-in-law has mental health problems and my husband thinks he can’t get him out of the house until he can maintain himself.

I’m worried that my husband will live longer than I am, and it’s okay for him to receive the house if he dies first, but I’m categorically opposed to my son-in-law who will eventually inherit the house under any circumstances. I have.

How can you build a will to carry out your wishes about your home to prevent it from being passed on to your son-in-law?

was locked up

You can email TheMoneyist financial and ethical questions related to the coronavirus at qfottrell@marketwatch.com.

Dear trap,

Before we talk about what happens after you leave, let’s talk about here and now.

You are in a dangerous house and surrounded by traumatic walls. We need a team to deal with the consequences of living with a man who is a bully and a perpetrator of elder abuse. That way, you and his living conditions can be dealt with. With the help of lawyers, financial planners, doctors and therapists, you can start breaking down the barriers of your fears and abuses and you will be able to deal with the in-store problem of what happens to your home. Be ahead of your husband.

But why does all the focus is on preventing this guy from inheriting your home? I agree that you should do everything with your power to make it happen, but you may have more than 10 or 20 years left, so your husband has him Why do you suffer because you can’t or don’t want to get rid of? You don’t have to live with abuse. There is no excuse for abuse. It’s time to end the rent-free reign of terror of your son-in-law in your home. You have the right to live safely and happily.

“”
What happens to your home after you leave is an important consideration for you. But given what you revealed in the letter, it should be far below your list of priorities.


— Money list

Georgia is a fair distribution country. For example, “both spouses generally have some property ownership, even though their names are not listed on the certificate.” According to Abbott & Abbott, Marietta and Canton, a law firm with offices in Georgia. Talk to a real estate planning lawyer about whether you can leave a life estate for your husband (he lives there after you die but doesn’t own a house) I paid off the house I brought to this marriage and used the proceeds to buy a new one.

contact information Georgia Adult Protection Services Find an organization that can report abuse and help you navigate the last years of your life to be free from harassment and abuse. If necessary, consult a lawyer, financial planner, therapist, doctor or even the police. You didn’t sign up for this when you got married, and the price you paid shouldn’t have been a peaceful life. If your husband waits and allows this to happen, he is helping to promote the abusive behavior of your son-in-law.

It is unlikely that your husband or son-in-law will change. But you can take action to make sure you feel safe in your own home and wake up in the morning and sleep at night. What happens to your home after you leave is an important consideration for you. But given what you revealed in the letter, it should be far below your list of priorities. I believe you can do it — and with the right amount of external support, I’m sure you’ll start believing it too.

About 1 in 4 people aged 65 will live over 90 and 1 in 10 will live over 95. According to the Social Security AdministrationMore than half of people over the age of 65 need some form of long-term care. You don’t want to be in a position where both your health and your husband’s health are so declining that you depend on them and are at the mercy of your son-in-law.Unless you force your son-in-law to leave, he never Leave.

Now is the time to act.

Moneyist:When my parents died, my sister and I split their property. I chose a painting that might be worth $ 50,000. Should I tell them?

Hello, MarketWatchers.check out Moneyist Private Facebook
FB,
-0.54%

A group where we look for answers to the most troublesome money problems in life. Readers write to me with all sorts of dilemmas. Please post a question or tell us what you want to know. Or consider the latest Moneyist column.

“I’m held hostage in my house”: My husband’s son lives with us.He is physically abusive and menacing

http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story.asp?guid=%7B51F64DBE-6C7F-11EB-B593-DD293CB95C4B%7D&siteid=rss&rss=1 “I’m held hostage in my house”: My husband’s son lives with us.He is physically abusive and menacing

Back to top button