Business & Investment

NatRoad wants to bring the auto speed camera sign back to New South Wales


NatRoad wants to revive the auto speed camera sign in New South Wales

NatRoad wants to revive the auto speed camera sign in New South Wales

The National Road Traffic Association will return the speed control machine sign and claim better data on Monday to inform the New South Wales State Assembly of traffic safety.

The New South Wales State Parliament Standing Committee on Road Safety is investigating state automatic speed cameras and the decision to remove warning signs in November 2020.

Warren Clarke, CEO of NatRoad, spends much of his awakening time behind the car to make a living, so his members have safety at the heart of everything they do. Is called.


Learn more about regulatory agency Nat Road’s support for transitioning from small fines


“Speed ​​limit signs play an important educational role,” says Clark.

“Reduce confusion by asking the driver to check the speed and slow down if necessary.

“Driver education is the basis of traffic safety, especially education for light vehicle drivers around large vehicles.”

NatRoad believes that slowing down is a factor in making roads safer, but it needs to be accompanied by other improvements, such as infrastructure improvements.

Clark quotes an expert commentary from the Center for Road Safety Research at the University of New South Wales, where simply setting slow limits is an inadequate approach to safety as compliance and can pose a problem for drivers. It says that there are many.

“There are many roads in New South Wales where different speed limits are applied to trucks, and there are also many roads with variable speed limits that are posted electronically,” he says.

“Variable signage is often undersized or misplaced, which leads to inadvertent non-compliance.

“Nat Road wants to put more emphasis on warning signs that are reasonably large and placed at decision points along the cargo route.”

NatRoad was surprised to hear from Revenue NSW in May this year that he wasn’t splitting speed violation data between heavy and light vehicles.

“This is ridiculous. If this basic data isn’t available, how can we measure the impact of enforcement on traffic safety records in the heavy-duty sector?” Clark says.

According to Clark, a study by the National Road Accident Research Center found that three-quarters of inadequate speed collisions are “off-pass on curves” collisions. These are basically rollover incidents.

“Therefore, when deploying automatic speed cameras, they should be placed with signs up to sharp corners, especially if the evidence shows that they are’black spots’,” Clark said. increase.

“Adjusting infrastructure, such as adjusting road camber, should be a top priority for all governments.”

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NatRoad wants to bring the auto speed camera sign back to New South Wales

http://www.ownerdriver.com.au/industry-news/2111/natroad-wants-speed-camera-signage-back-in-nsw/ NatRoad wants to bring the auto speed camera sign back to New South Wales

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