Science & Technology

New dipping solution turns whole fish into valuable food

After the fillet, many valuable and nutritious parts of the fish remain, such as the spine, head and fins. By immersing these sidestreams in specially developed solutions containing ingredients such as rosemary extract and citric acid, their shelf life can be significantly extended and useful time for further processing them. Give a frame. Haizhou Wu is one of the researchers in this project. Credits: PIXTA, Haizhou Wu / Chalmers, Xueqing Lei, Freepik

When herring becomes a fillet, more than half its weight becomes a low-value “sidestream” and never reaches the plate, despite being rich in protein and healthy omega-3 fatty acids.Scientists from now Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden has developed a special soaking solution using ingredients such as rosemary extract and citric acid acid, You can significantly extend the shelf life of sidestreams and increase the chances of using them as food.

Techniques for upgrading these sidestreams to foods such as minced meats, protein isolates, hydrolysates, oils, etc. are already available today and use them in animal feed, or in the worst case, simply throw them. Away from them, it offers the opportunity to reduce current practices.

Haizhou Wu Fish Dip

Haizhou Wu, a researcher at Chalmers University of Technology, immerses the sidestream portion of herring in a solution of ingredients such as rosemary extract and citric acid. Dip extends the shelf life of the sidestream and increases its potential for use in food. Credits: Xueqing Lei / Chalmersteknis kahögskola

However, the big challenge is that the unsaturated fatty acids in fish are very sensitive to oxidative degradation. In other words, quality begins to deteriorate in just a few hours. The result is an unpleasant taste, odor, color and texture in the final product. The sidestream parts of fish, such as the spine and head, are so sensitive because they are rich in blood and contain the protein hemoglobin, which accelerates the fatty acid breakdown process.

“Our new technology provides producers with a valuable time frame that allows sidestreams to remain fresh longer and can be stored or transported before upgrading to a variety of food ingredients,” said the department’s foods. Ingrid Undeland, a professor of science, said. He holds a PhD in Biology and Biotechnology from Chalmers University of Technology.

The new technology is based on dipping solutions containing ingredients such as rosemary extract and citric acid. Within the framework of a European project called WaSeaBi, along with colleagues Haizhou Wu and Mursalin Sajib, Ingrid Undeland recently published a scientific study exploring the possibilities of this method.

Recycle the solution up to 10 times

The results showed that immersing the sidestream portion of the herring fillet process in solution prior to storage significantly prolongs the time to rancidification. At 20 ° C, the storage period can be extended from less than half a day to more than three and a half days, and at 0 degrees it can be extended from less than one day to more than 11 days.

Food from whole herring

Even after the fillet, many valuable and nutritious parts of the fish, such as the spine, remain. By immersing these sidestreams in specially developed solutions containing ingredients such as rosemary extract and citric acid, their shelf life can be significantly extended and useful time for further processing them. Give a frame. Credits: Haizhou Wu / Chalmersteknis kahögskola

“And because the dipping solution covers the surface of the sidestream with a thin layer of antioxidant, these are carried over to the next stage of the process, providing a higher quality minced, protein, or oil component.” Ingrid Undeland explains.

The possibility of reusing the solution to make the technology cost-effective was also investigated. The results showed that rancidification was completely suppressed at 0 ° C, even after the solution was reused up to 10 times. In addition, this solution was found to keep fish hemoglobin in a more stable and less reactive form with fatty acids. Researchers believe this explains the reduction in oxidation.

Ingrid Andeland

Ingrid Undeland, Professor of Food Science, Department of Biology and Bioengineering, Chalmers University of Technology. Credits :: Anna-Lena Lundqvist / Chalmersteknis kahögskola

Research details and sidestream possibilities

the study, Hemoglobin-mediated lipid oxidation of the herring (Clupea harengus) by-product is controlled via incubation or immersion in a recyclable antioxidant solution.As published in the journal with open access Food managementThis was based on the herring sidestream of the Swedish pelagic, but the results obtained by soaking the cod sidestream from Royal Greenland show that the rosemary-based antioxidant mixture provides excellent protection from oxidation. I have also confirmed that. This means that this solution can be used to prevent rancidification of sidestreams in different types of fish.

Examples of valuable sidestreams from fish include, for example, the spine and head, which are rich in muscle and are therefore suitable for minced fish or protein components. The flaps and intestines of the abdomen are rich in omega 3 fatty acids and can be used for oil production. The tail fin is rich in skin, bone and connective tissue, making it suitable, for example, for the production of marine collagen, a very popular ingredient on the market today. In addition to foods, marine collagen is also used in cosmetics and “dietary supplements” and has been shown to have a positive effect on joint and skin health.

Reference: “Control of hemoglobin-mediated lipid oxidation in herring (Clupea harengus) By-products of incubation or immersion in recyclable antioxidant solutions, February 11, 2021, by Haizhou Wu, Mursarin Sajib, and Ingrid Undeland. ” Food management..
DOI: 10.1016 / j.foodcont.2021.107963

About the project

WaSeaBi is a four-year project aimed at optimizing the use of sidestream seafood by developing new ways to produce delicious, nutritious ingredients. The project includes 13 partners from five European countries, including Technical University of Denmark, Food & Bio Cluster Denmark, Chalmers University of Technology, AZTI, EIT Food, Sweden Pelagic, Royal Greenland, Alfa Laval, Pescados Marcelino and Jeka. Team is gathered. Fish, Barna, Nutrition Science, Ghent University.

This project is funded by the BioBased Industries Joint Undertaking (JU) under the European Union’s Horizontal 2020 Research and Innovation Program under Grant Agreement No. 837726. JU is supported by the European Union’s Horizontal 2020 Research and Innovation Program and the BioBased Industries Consortium. ..



New dipping solution turns whole fish into valuable food

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