Business & Investment

Should I stop manual driving as electric cars kill gear changes?

Wow, it’s as easy as driving a go-kart, I remember saying a few years ago my current wife went home with an automatic Ford Fiesta.

She has lived in Australia for nearly a year and was accustomed to automatic gearboxes. She didn’t understand the implications of returning to manual life in the UK.

I was skeptical. Wasn’t the automatic car just for lazy and trashy drivers?

The manual is the king. After all, the majority learn with a manual car and then buy a manual car. Gasoline heads say that actual driving involves gear changes. Therefore, a manual car is the best personal transportation tool to move from A to B.

There must be an automatic car, a catch …

My Gateway Auto: Our Trust Ford Fiesta was agile, agile and a pleasure to drive

When I first approached the Fiesta roundabout, it was immediately blown out of the water for me, and I realized how much thought time and zipper I had in the automatic.

Since then, I’ve been obsessed with self-driving and have found it much easier to navigate overseas cars in the US and Italy. Press the ignition button to move from P to D or R and lower your foot.

When Fiesta was abandoned for a larger car for our growing family, the only option was automatic replacement.

Well, the stubborn petrol head I know reads this with a horrifying look – this includes Simon Lambert, the money editor and owner of the old school hot hatch Peugeot 205 GTI.

But as someone who doesn’t fall into this category and likes a simple life, I can’t imagine going back to a clunky manual car.

Recently, we have put a lot of effort into electric vehicles. No matter where you stand, it’s clear that technology is improving as more manufacturers invest in R & D.

This hopes the price will go down as more adoptions are made and a better charging infrastructure-actually new Brain Tree Super Forecoat Only 20 minutes from my house.

However, what the average person doesn’t think much about is that all mass-produced electric vehicles are equipped with a 1-speed automatic transmission.

That is, you don’t have to change gears. It’s just self-driving.

Would you like to buy an electric car? You will drive an automatic. And soon, you may run out of many options for this.

So we’ve already seen the beginning of the end of manual gearboxes, and for the vast majority of people, it’s even important. Consumer trends are looking at whether automatic cars have already taken over in recent years and what the future holds for driving.

“I hate driving …”

I’ve lost counts in recent years when someone says they hate driving, especially when someone who lives in London or who hasn’t driven a car for years finds out of practice. ..

Try automatic, my normal response. A friend I said this last summer received my advice and after a while she revealed that she just did it and wouldn’t come back.

Meanwhile, an elderly family member who broke his left wrist a few years ago realized that driving was a pain when he recovered thanks to a clunky gear change and tried to give up.

Again, what was my response? Try automatic. She did exactly that and didn’t look back.

There are statistics to support the adoption of the automated model.

According to the Motor Manufacturers Association, about two out of every five new cars registered in 2017 were cars. That number is twice that of 10 years ago.

Meanwhile, even in the highly malicious UK driving test, the number of people following automatic routes is increasing rapidly.

Perhaps it’s the fear of stall or the beginning of those horrific hills.

Of course, in the future only automatic cars will be able to drive, but given the choice and driving of electricity, that doesn’t seem to matter more and more.

Auto Boom: The number of automated tests has almost tripled in just eight years, DVSA data show

Auto Boom: The number of automated tests has almost tripled in just eight years, DVSA data show

According to DVSA data, the number of automated driving tests has almost tripled in just eight years.

In 2019/20 (until the end of March 2020), there were 202,506 people, but in 2011/12, there were 70,429 people. On the other hand, the overall number of tests, both automatic and manual, remains about 1.6 million.

This means that about 13% of the tests on the latest datasets were automated tests, compared to 4.5% in 2011/12.

This suggests that future drivers willingly accept the future without being allowed to drive the manual.

It suggests that many people don’t care about clutch control and gear changes.

However, it is worth pointing out that the pass rate for automatic transmissions is much lower, probably suggesting less confidence in the driver.

Automation: According to RAC, many vans are automated, improving economics and reducing running costs.

Automation: According to RAC, many vans are automated, improving economics and reducing running costs.

Are you dazzled by the manual?

RAC spokesman Rod Dennis believes that the day of the manual driving test is numbered.

He told me:’Manual gearboxes are still dominant today, but they are definitely written on their walls because electric cars are so popular.

“And strangely enough, if the rise of single-gear cars becomes unstoppable, drivers can get quite cloudy about the’manual’.

With the rise of single-gear cars unstoppable, drivers can become quite cloudy about the “manual.”

“After all, gear switching is an integral part of driving for many of us, learning to drive, and one of the main ways we feel in controlling a car.

“The incredibly smooth power supply from an electric motor is unsatisfactory, but a completely different experience.”

In the near future, all manual cars may be labeled as classic cars.

Rod also points out that more than half of RAC patrol vans are equipped with automatic transmissions, and the proportion is constantly increasing.

He adds: ‘They provide a smoother and more comfortable driving experience for our patrols, improve the economy and, interestingly, less to maintain, so running costs are lower. Therefore, the fuel and environmental benefits of automatic transmissions are clear.

Greater Expenses: Automatic cars are a bit more expensive than manual cars, but in my opinion they are worth the extra cash.Photo: VW Golf

Greater Expenses: Automatic cars are a bit more expensive than manual cars, but in my opinion they are worth the extra cash.Photo: VW Golf

Disadvantages

Automatic cars tend to be about £ 1,000 more expensive than manual cars.

For example, a 2.0-liter diesel VW Golf with a mid-spec “style” trim level costs £ 26,545 for a 6-speed manual and £ 28,045 for a 7-speed DSG automatic.

Also, cars are usually a bit more expensive to insure, as the cost of repairing the gearbox is higher if something goes wrong.

But as Rod points out, as the car works and puts you in the right gear faster, fuel economy tends to be slightly better, which can balance costs.

Also, getting used to automatic and going back to manual can be difficult. This can be tricky depending on where you are, such as when hiring a car abroad.

In the United States, almost all cars are automatic, so cost and choice are not an issue. The opposite is true in Europe, so automatic car rentals can be a bit more expensive.

But that’s the end of my list. Personally, I think trying automatic is the perfect Segway for an electric car 10 years from now.

Self-driving cars are still in their infancy, but it’s also worth pointing out that there is little or no driver input. Just because you haven’t changed gears automatically doesn’t mean you haven’t done much yet. Work and it’s not fun.

I don’t think there is a lot of joy in driving in the UK in 2021 …

Traffic, medium lane highway hoggers, automatic speed cameras, box junction fines, terrifying A roads, terrifying B roads, country roads with holes … embrace the new Gokart era and move safely and easily from A to B The time has come. Place an image of hair driving in a convertible on a beautiful tree-lined road away from the 1960s.

The past is manual. The future is automatic.

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Should I stop manual driving as electric cars kill gear changes?

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