Science & Technology

take down!SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with dragon spacecraft explodes from Kennedy’s launch pad 39A

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket will be launched on December 21, 2021 from the Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This launch is the company’s 24th commercial replenishment service mission to NASA. Credit: NASA

There is a lift off! Nine Marlin engines at 5:07 am on the EST SpaceXThe Falcon 9 rocket came to life by turning off the launch pad from the launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The rocket is carrying the Dragon Spacecraft on the company’s 24th Commercial Resupply Services mission. NASA..

Dragons scheduled to dock with the International Space Station in less than 24 hours from now cost more than £ 6,500 Science and research experiments, Crew supply, and vehicle hardware to orbiting laboratories.

Upon arrival in about 1 minute, the rocket will pass the max q. This is the moment of peak mechanical stress on the rocket. After that, the first and second stages of Falcon 9 are separated.

SpaceX Falcon 9 Cargo Dragon before lift off

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket with the Dragon spacecraft is ready to be launched at Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The company’s 24th Commercial Resupply Services mission to NASA is targeted for launch at 5:07 am EST on December 21, 2021, providing new scientific research, supplies, and equipment to the crew of the International Space Station. To do. Credit: NASA

The destination is the International Space Station, which will be docked for about a month. The dragon will arrive on Wednesday, December 22nd at around 3am and will dock in about 90 minutes. NASA astronauts Rajachari and Thomas Marshburn will monitor operations while the spacecraft autonomously docks to the orbiting laboratory harmony module.

SpaceX Falcon9 Cargo Dragon Launch Pad

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket with the Dragon spacecraft is ready to be launched at Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Credit: NASA

update:

The main engine stops and the first stage of Falcon 9 separates

The nine Marlin engines on the Falcon 9 rocket have finished burning and the first stage has separated from the rocket. The second stage will continue to carry the dragon in flight, so the first stage of the rocket will attempt a targeted landing on the drone ship “Read Instructions”. It comes in just about 6 minutes.

update:

SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket First Stage Land

The first stage of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket will land on its “Just Read the Instructions” droneship in the Atlantic Ocean. Credit: NASA

Successful landing of Falcon 9 1st stage

The first stage of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket landed on its “Just Read the Instructions” droneship in the Atlantic Ocean, completing a perfect landing. This marks the 100th successful landing and recovery for the post-launch Phase 1 booster company.

Next comes the dragon, leaving the second stage of the rocket and continuing its journey to the International Space Station.

update:

Dragon separated from Falcon 9 rocket

On December 21, 2021, an unmanned Dragon spacecraft separated from the second stage of the Falcon 9 rocket after NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida launched its 24th commercial supply service mission. Credit: NASA

Dragon separated from Falcon 9 rocket

The unmanned spacecraft has separated from the second stage of the Falcon 9 rocket and continues its journey to the International Space Station. The company’s 24th cargo supply mission will bring over £ 6,500 in scientific testing and research, crew supplies, and hardware to orbiting laboratories.

The dragon will arrive at the space station around 3 am on Wednesday, December 22, and will dock approximately 90 minutes later. Expedition 66 66 Rajachari and Thomas Marshburn will monitor operations while the spacecraft autonomously docks to the orbiting laboratory harmony module.

The dragon is expected to autonomously undock and return to Earth, spending about a month attached to the space station before flying into the Atlantic Ocean for research and return cargo.

update:

The nose cone opens and the dragon continues its journey to the space station

The dragon’s nose cone is open and the spacecraft is safely in orbit after the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket was launched from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 5:07 am on the EST, at £ 6,500. We carry more than research, crew supplies and hardware to the International Space Station. Space station.

The dragon will arrive at the orbital outpost around 3 am EST on Wednesday, December 22nd. Docking coverage will begin at 3 am on NASA Television, agency websites, and the NASA app.

Upon arriving at the space station, the dragon autonomously docks to the positive port of the station’s Harmony Module, with NASA’s 66th Expedition Engineers Rajachari and Thomas Marshburn.

The 24th cargo mission to SpaceX’s space station under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Agreement supports dozens of new and existing expeditions, bringing critical supplies and hardware to orbital outposts, and the 66th long-term. We support staying crew.

In November, the station goes beyond the 21-year milestone of continuous human existence and offers unique research and technology demonstration opportunities to help improve life on Earth and prepare for the institution’s long-term mission to the Moon and the Moon. Provided. Mars.. To date, the orbiting lab has hosted approximately 3,000 research studies from researchers in 108 countries and territories.



take down!SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with dragon spacecraft explodes from Kennedy’s launch pad 39A

https://scitechdaily.com/liftoff-spacex-falcon-9-rocket-with-dragon-spacecraft-blasts-off-from-kennedys-launch-pad-39a/ take down!SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with dragon spacecraft explodes from Kennedy’s launch pad 39A

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