Business & Investment

Why villas have more jobs and less play

This article has been reprinted with permission from Escape home, A newsletter for anyone who wants to be a second homeowner.Apply here.. © 2021. all rights reserved.

The coronavirus pandemic has changed the way we live and work-and it’s driving a change in the way custom builders design new villas.

Rustic log huts, small bohemian dwellings, and wine cellars were less popular during the pandemic era, as villa buyers wanted more of the following equipment:

  • More bedrooms and ensuites to accommodate extended families

  • Multi-functional room for homeschooling and quarantine

  • Mud chamber also called “drop zone” for decontamination

  • More outdoor living space

Bedroom with ensuite at 112 Elk Point in Durango, Colorado.

Classic builder, Durango, Colorado.

An outdoor fire pit at 112 Elk Point in Durango, Colorado.

Classic builder, Durango, Colorado.

“People call it COVID design. In the past, they also wanted some of their major home features,” said Frank Enea, president of Classique Builders in Durango, Corona. favorite:

  • Two home offices, one for each spouse

  • Sufficient storage space for entertainment equipment such as mountain bikes, kayaks and skis

  • Larger mud room to isolate clothing and backpacks from the rest of the house (mud rooms are so fashionable that I’ll list them twice)

45 Eagles Nest Mud Room in Durango, Colorado.

Classic builder, Durango, Colorado.

Interior design is becoming more sophisticated. For the past decade, Classique Builders’ most popular design has been “mountain modern,” partly rustic and partly modern. But now there’s a growing demand for what the company calls a “sophisticated mountain,” a fusion of LA-inspired design and rustic style. In other words, villa buyers still want a naive element, but not very naive. A smooth wall, not a log wall.

A “sophisticated mountain” living space at 112 Elk Point in Durango, Colorado.

Classic builder, Durango, Colorado.

However, the biggest demand from custom villa buyers is an outdoor living space where families can interact in remote locations.

“Not everyone has a million dollars to build a large outdoor living room, but maybe they want a really nice deck with a fire pit.”

An outdoor deck at 112 Elk Point in Durango, Colorado.

Classic builder, Durango, Colorado.

That all means that the villa is growing. In some cases, villas are now larger than villas due to the fusion of three different lifestyles: work, school and play. As a result, homebuilders are redesigning their most popular models to include additional room and space.

Ten years ago, the addition of a popular room included non-essential features such as a wine cellar, which architects say has changed. “Now we’re adding more functional rooms, reflecting the new lifestyle we’re experiencing in a pandemic,” said Kermit Baker, Chief Economist at the American Institute of Architects.

A multifunctional space in 45 Eagles Nest in Durango, Colorado.

Classic builder, Durango, Colorado.

Each year, the Institute surveys home architects and homebuilders on housing design trends. The latest survey, published in September (the first survey since the COVID-19 crisis), found that:

  • 68% of respondents say home office popularity has increased over the past year, from 29% in 2019.

  • 61% of respondents say that demand for outdoor living space is increasing, as it was in 2019.

Office space at 112 Elk Point in Durango, Colorado.

Classic builder, Durango, Colorado.

Two features reduced in 2020 that didn’t show up in the 2019 survey:

  • Multi-functional room that can meet various needs such as quarantine room

  • An exercise room that reflects the continued avoidance of public gyms and health clubs.

“It grew a lot in 2019 and is now growing again,” Baker said of the outdoor space.

Even in the northeast, where winters can be very cold, vacation homebuilders are designing more outdoor living spaces that can be used for several seasons.

Jason Beane, designer of Blue Water Construction & Development, which builds custom homes in the lake area of ​​New Hampshire, said his company has traditionally built villas that are primarily used in the summer. But now the building is designed for year-round use.

“Outdoor kitchens and outdoor living spaces have always been a big design feature in our villas, but now outdoor spaces are designed for three seasons, not just one season,” he said. This means adding heating elements inside and outside. “We are warming the garage now,” Bean said.

A popular feature is the 3-season pouch. This is a screen-in room away from the main building, usually with many windows and skylights. For the comfort of the cold season, the room is designed to include a gas heater or fireplace and a glass insert that replaces the screen in the fall. “Screen-in pouches are always popular, but we can see more than ever.” Bluewater specializes in half-timbered homes in Adirondack.

An outdoor living space located at 45 Eagles Nest in Durango, Colorado.

Classic builder, Durango, Colorado.

The big question now is whether these design trends and our embrace of spending more time outdoors in the cold will be long-lasting or a temporary response to a pandemic. If so, the basement can be returned to the wine cellar at any time.

This article has been reprinted with permission from Escape home, A newsletter for anyone who wants to be a second homeowner.Apply here.. © 2021. all rights reserved.

Why villas have more jobs and less play

http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story.asp?guid=%7B21005575-02D4-D4B5-4572-D217A510A426%7D&siteid=rss&rss=1 Why villas have more jobs and less play

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