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Women in Mathematics, Science and Engineering Employer Panels – UConn Center for Career Development

Career Development Center and Women in Mathematics, Science and Engineering (WiMSE) Learning community He recently hosted an employer panel featuring Andrea Jones, Chief Human Resources Officer of FuelCell Energy, Kaitlin Paine, an implementation consultant for Fast Enterprises, and Katie Jacobson, a civil engineer at VHB. These skilled professionals shared their extensive experience with WiMSE and answered questions about pivoting, competition, and impostor syndrome.

Regarding career pivoting, three women talked about finding their current position through trial and error. The value of internships and shadowing is that you can find out if your career really suits you before you commit to it. For example, Katie Jacobson originally wanted to be a teacher, but he wanted to be a teacher, but by shadowing he realized he wasn’t for him. I did. Instead, in one technical course at the university, she became very interested in civil engineering and started working at VHB, a company focused primarily on transportation, land and energy solutions.

As the conversation turned to competition, Andrea Jones emphasized that your organization has great talent and culture. You can’t attract talent without a strong culture in the first place. Therefore, in addition to providing sufficient rewards to candidates, it is to have a strong team bond to attract solid achievements and talents. Kaitlin Paine also mentioned the importance of transparency and the need for “excessive communication.” This ensures that future candidates or clients stay in the loop and are free of misunderstandings.

As a woman in math, science and engineering Impostor syndrome It was especially relevant. Impostor syndrome is the feeling of success, but somehow unworthy or unfit for your identity. Andrea Jones sympathized with her being a result-focused female executive, saying she looked “classy” to her prejudiced people. Still, she said wisely. She says, “10 percent of life is what happens to you. 90 percent of life is how you react.” Regardless of your identity, being genuine about yourself and with yourself. Will attract followers. “You know more than you think,” Katie Jacobson reminded the students.

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Photo courtesy ThisIsEngineering from Pexel

Women in Mathematics, Science and Engineering Employer Panels – UConn Center for Career Development

https://career.uconn.edu/blog/2022/05/16/recap-women-in-math-science-and-engineering-employer-panel/ Women in Mathematics, Science and Engineering Employer Panels – UConn Center for Career Development

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